Movie Reviews

The Most Successful Movie Franchises In History [Infographic]

The Most Successful Movie Franchises In History [Infographic]

Apr 15, 2015

Furious 7, the latest installment in the Fast & Furious film series, made headlines over the past few days after scoring the ninth-largest opening weekend in U.S. box office history. So far, Furious 7 has proven the highest-grossing film of 2015 and propelled the franchise into billion dollar territory. According to Box Office Mojo, the Fast and Furious franchise has now grossed just under $1.2 billion domestically. How does that  compare with Hollywood’s other leading franchises?  Overall, the Marvel Cinematic Universe series of superhero films including Iron Man, The Avengers and Thor: The Dark World, is the most successful movie franchise, grossing a grand total of $2.95 billion at the North American box office. Harry Potter comes close behind with $2.4 billion, while Star Wars rounds off the top three with $1.92 billion.   more of this...

WONDER WOMAN MOVIE LOSES ITS DIRECTOR

WONDER WOMAN MOVIE LOSES ITS DIRECTOR

Apr 14, 2015

“Given creative differences, Warner Bros. and Michelle MacLaren have decided not to move forward with plans to develop and direct Wonder Woman together,” said the studio in a statement, via The Hollywood Reporter. It was announced last November that Warner Bros. had brought on MacLaren, a TV veteran whose credits include Breaking Bad, Game of Thrones and The Walking Dead, to develop and direct their Wonder Woman solo movie starring Gal Gadot. more of this...

The Hobbit: Battle of Five Armies Review

The Hobbit: Battle of Five Armies Review

Dec 9, 2014

At the start of the first Lord of the Rings movie, Bilbo complains to his friend Gandalf, he says  “I feel thin, sort of stretched, like butter scraped over too much bread.” Well, turns out that is exactly how one could describe this, the last movie in Bilbo’s story. The Hobbit: Battle of the Five Armies finishes off Peter Jackson’s trilogy exactly the way it started, so much time, but not enough substance. So at least they are consistent. This chapter picks up EXACTLY where we left off. Smaug is out and Laketown is in very grave danger, the citizens, aided by dauntless father Bard (Luke Evans), flee to the Mountains. There our team of Dwarves have barricaded themselves in, watching over their newly retrieved treasure, but something isn’t right. Thorin is a changed man (or should I say Dwarf), changed by the power and a gold-obsessed ailment they call “Dragon Sickness”. He is not ready to be charitable, to the men of Laketown or any of armies which come, one by one to pry his treasure from his hands. But a common enemy bonds all; elves, men and dwarves must unite in order to fight off the orcs before the end.   It’s nearly impossible to talk about this film on its own merits, or lack there of. It’s the bloated end to the already bloated first and second, it was never meant to stand on its own and its carries on its predecessors pitfalls. No individualization of characters, a mission that is difficult to care about, constant unnecessary winks to the Lord of the Rings audience, and, worst of all, a tone that is incredibly unrelentlessly serious despite itself.   But not to worry, it has plenty of its own unique flaws. It is, after all simply, the 3rd act of the story, this entire movie is the end of a story, which means it’s about 80% fighting. It’s so much fighting that all of the big set pieces begin to cancel each other out. One by one we watch as each hero has his or her moment; they fight orcs on mountains, they fight orcs on ice and, of course, they...