Movie Reviews

The Great Gatsby Movie Review

The Great Gatsby Movie Review

Feb 15, 2015

by Brian Boon   The Great Gatsby is a romance film directed by Australian director, BazLurhmann. It is based on F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby. Fans of F. Scott Fitzgerald might be a little pleased to have BazLurhmann, the man who has produced critically acclaimed romance movies to produce an adaptation of the classic book.  Moreover, the line up for casts is truly impressive especially with the presence of A-list actors, Leonardo Dicaprio and Tobey. The anticipation for the movie increases with the news of Bollywood’s legend, Amitabh Bachchan will be included in the cast. The film was released in cinemas on 10th of May 2013.   Let’s move a few steps back in time. The Great Gatsby has a long winding history from the early days where it was first created in the hands of F. Scott Fitzgerald to its last appearance in cinemas in the year 1974.  The book was  labelled as a failure after its poor sales in its first publication. It just managed to sell a barely 20,000 in the first year which made Fitzgerald believed that he was a total failure until his death. After World War II, the book was given recognition as one of the Great American Novel. Soon after that, several films followed and as if it was cursed, all of the films were below par. The last one in 1974 was directed horribly and audience were having a hard time to keep their eyes open. The 1974 version starring Robert Redford was unfortunately too boring and sparkled a debate among the public over the worthiness of the Great American Novel. Since then, The Great Gatsby was never mentioned in the entertainment world.   It was a real surprise to see BazLurhmann taking the challenge of adapting the book for his latest film. The Great Gatsby is not an easy story to be adapted perfectly for cinema goers. Most of the cinema goers prefer action, blockbuster movies rather than an adaptation of a classic book. Many of us were left in wonder over Lurhmann’s decision. Will he be another M. Night Shyamalan? Lurhmann must not only be able to retain the classic feel of...

Big Hero 6 Movie Review

Big Hero 6 Movie Review

Feb 10, 2015

Big Hero 6 is no doubt one of the most anticipated Disney movies of the year 2014. It was released in United States of America on 7th November 2014. So what actually is Big Hero 6 about? The movie is based on Marvel’s Big Hero 6, a comic book series released somewhere in the 90s. Perhaps most of Marvel’s fans have not heard of this comic book series ever in their life. Well, they can’t be blame as the series had such a brief appearance that even Marvel had completely forgotten of their existence. However, when Disney bought over Marvel in 2009, there had been rumours on whether Disney would incorporate Marvel’s characters into their movies. Most of the fans were placing their bets on the well known superheroes of Marvel- Ironman, Captain America, Hulk and the Avengers. However, the very question is are those superheroes fitting to be in Disney movies? Well, Disney are famous for movies which are specially made for kids and there can’t be any violence or brutal scene. With that, Disney finally chose a not so famous Big Hero 6 for their latest movie. Fans might be a little disappointed at the decision and must be left in wonder over the identity of this so called Marvel superheroes.The original Big Hero 6 was a mesh up of Japanese manga and old school style. How could Disney bring in Japanese anime for their movies? When the trailer of Big Hero 6 was revealed, many fans heaved a sigh of relief. Disney made a huge transformation in the characters of Big Hero 6, weaving their magic wand and turn them into Disney like character. ( Honestly, the characters do look like a little like those from Pixar). Anyway, well done Disney. The original characters such as Baymax, Gogo and Honey Lemon were not a child friendly as in the movie. Once again, Disney showed their brilliance in turning those characters especially Baymax into a cute, adorable characters. Big Hero 6 is truly a well weaved film which displays the beauty of the modern animation. The design of the futuristic fictional city of Sanfransokyo( a combination San Francisco and Tokyo) was captivating....

Ugly – A Review

Ugly – A Review

Feb 7, 2015

A cop is more interested in how a caller’s picture can be displayed on cell phone- One of the finest sequences of the film as it highlights the irreverence with which the acerbic Jadhav, played by GirishKulkarni , inquires about the missing daughter of Rahul, played by Rahul Bhat. Jadhav who doesn’t take Rahul seriously until he gets to know that Kali’s step father is his austere boss Shoumik. A perfect sequence that depicts the exasperation and acute distress prevalent in the India’s underbelly. The story of the missing kid somehow gets lost midway when multitudes of shady characters start exploiting the situation for their own twisted motives. That may be the only foible in this otherwise towering cinematic experience.   Such flashes of irreverence have been present in AnuraghKashyap’s earlier outings too like the scene in Gangs of Wasseypur where three goons blabber on about a jackfruit while following a target to shoot. ‘Ugly’ has such moments aplenty as the director makes viewers fretful while the story unfolds. Such blithe disregard of the “rules” is what makes AnuraghKashyap’s movie so hard-hitting gritty and realistic. Defying the essence of Bollywood is what he does tremendously well and he has done it again. Unencumbered ,Anuragh infuses a whiff of fresh air of reality in his movies that are a fry cry from the cliched Bollywood’s‘ crime movie’ genre. The writing is taut and the background score by Brian Mcomber is hauntingly beautiful. Anuragh described this movie as the one “he wanted to make always”. He was not shackled by anything during the production of the film-neither the nuisance of  making  mass appealing commercial film nor being dictated by the norms.   A gut-wrenching portrait of Mumbai where callous impassive individuals hunt for money and fight for ego as the stepfather and the biological father indulge in a race to find Kali trying to upstage each other. Shalini , the mother of the missing Kali, who is coerced into staying home by his stern cold-blooded husband, a cop, Shoumik Bose embodied to perfection by Ronit Roy. He was impeccable. Watch him clench his jaw and it will petrify you enough to give you a jolt in...

The Descent (2005) – Insider

The Descent (2005) – Insider

Feb 3, 2015

The Descent  it is one of the most thrilling horror movies I have ever watched (and I have watched lots of horror movies). Those who are passionate about horror movies know how difficult it can be to find a movie that can scare you in such a way that it is impossible to fall asleep at night. How often do you watch a movie that can make you jump out of the bed? Well, not often, but this movie can do that. Plot The Descent (2005)  had one of the best plots I have ever seen, and it has a big score on IMDB, which is a score of 7.3 of 10. Not many horror movies manage to obtain such a high score. It is about a group of women who want to cheer up one of their friends who lost her daughter and husband in a car accident with a year before the actual action. However, they have chosen an unmapped cave, and they will realize their mistake when they will have to face some weird creatures that are surviving by eating human flesh. The first 10 minutes of the movie are a bit boring, but once they start moving forward in that cave everything becomes more exciting and scary. What I have found to be very interesting was the fact that the movie was all about women, their fears, their will to survive and the bond of their friendship. The real action starts when the women become trapped in that cave after a part of it collapses. As that cave was unmapped, no one knew a way out of it. So, they have to find a way out of the cave while fighting with the creatures that are planning to have them as dinner. During their attempt to escape they have to be strong as agroup and individually as well. When you will watch the movie you will actually feel their will of surviving, despite what they must do in order to get out of that horrifying cave. This movie  can be found on all tops with the best horror movies ever made. Not only that it is in those tops, but...

No country for old men. — A review

No country for old men. — A review

Feb 1, 2015

  “No country for old men” ,directed by the duo brothers Joel And Ethan Coen, is adapted from Cormac McCarthy’s gripping novel of the same name. I felt the same eerie ambiance and a foreboding silence enveloping around me when I watched Fargo , the duo’s most accomplished venture as of yet. But this time the ambiance was more profound, more relentlessly violent  and menacing. An expansive parched West Texas landscape in the opening scene as Ed Tom Bell lambastes the increasing violence in the area as he rose to the ranks of sheriff just like father.  A botched up drug deal makes up the premise as the protagonist, Llewelyn Moss played by the hardened Josh Brolin, wanders around the carnage landing upon a satchel filled with two million dollars. Moss is portrayed as just like one of us-the ordinary guy- shackled by money.The violence that ensues later throughout the movie , a gut-wrenching portrait of the lust for money, spins around the very cash-stuffed suitcase which Moss stole from the scene . It gets darker when Anton Chigurh (played by Javier Bardem) steps in , a ruthless impassive sociopath with his captive bolt pistol held firmly in his hands and sporting a haircut that will force a chuckle out of you .  McCarthy described him in the novel having a dark complexion with eyes “blue as lapis … Like wet stones” .A cat-and-mouse drama ensues as Anton viciously pursues Moss for that suitcase. The only modicum of sanity he shows is by bestowing his victims with a second chance by deciding their fate with a coin toss. His morbid fascination with killing almost everyone he meets and his quirky acts makes you cringe sometimes but still you can’t take your eyes off the screen. In one of his scenes ‘Call it’ he says in that throaty tone to the gas station owner-a surprisingly funny moment in a darkly comic way that is prevailing throughout the film.  His dark looming spectre, keeps our eyes glued to screens inculcating an air of trepidation. In one of his opening scenes he brutally strangles an officer with a stony deadpan face that may easily feed nightmares to...

Laggies (2014) – “stop lagging and start living”

Laggies (2014) – “stop lagging and start living”

Jan 29, 2015

When you want to enjoy a slick romantic comedy there’s nothing more entertaining than a coming of age story from director Lynn Shelton, especially when it involves love and friendship along with a great deal of coziness that makes you feel like your own wavering instincts are shown onto the screen.  That’s exactly how Laggies feels like because it’s a comedy so well written that becomes easy to decipher from every standpoint, although the title is a little dopey. The story of Megan (Keira Knightley), a woman very close to the age of 30,  starts off with the depiction of her current life that seems deadlocked career wise and far from being what anybody else would want for themselves. She creates the impression of a clueless person that has no aspiration or ambition while her high school friends are getting married or having kids.  She refuses to use her advanced degree in family therapy and she’s constantly behaving like a kid around her father (Jaff Garlin). Overwhelmed by a marriage proposal from her long term boyfriend (Mark Webber) Megan takes some time away to think it through and meets a 16-year-old high school student Annika (Chloe Grace Moretz). She moves in with Annika and her dad Craig (Sam Rockwell) for a week while she tries to find out what she wants from life. While lying to her boyfriend that she is at a life management seminar, Megan founds herself in the middle of sorting out her lack of decision making, stricken by the thought of an uncertain future. Despite of being an over-educated young woman Megan cannot make a decision regarding her lifestyle and starts hanging out with Annika and her group of friends. The plot is written with wit and manages to create a clever story that develops in a normal and enjoyable pace, nuanced by playfulness and  congeniality, especially when the characters don’t fall under the circumstances of a rough stereotype. It’s really special to be able to see the portraying of such a sweet and rational adolescent like Annika and a woman with a very well defined cordial personality  like Megan. To complete this comes the character of Annika’s dad, Craig...